America’s Productivity Climbs, but Wages Stagnate (it’s a Concentration problem, not a Redistribution issue)

Wages have fallen to a record low as a share of America’s gross domestic product. Until 1975, wages nearly always accounted for more than 50 percent of the nation’s G.D.P., but last year wages fell to a record low of 43.5 percent. Since 2001, when the wage share was 49 percent, there has been a steep slide.

“We went almost a century where the labor share was pretty stable and we shared prosperity,” says Lawrence Katz, a labor economist at Harvard. “What we’re seeing now is very disquieting.” For the great bulk of workers, labor’s shrinking share is even worse than the statistics show, when one considers that a sizable — and growing — chunk of overall wages goes to the top 1 percent: senior corporate executives, Wall Street professionals, Hollywood stars, pop singers and professional athletes. The share of wages going to the top 1 percent climbed to 12.9 percent in 2010, from 7.3 percent in 1979.

Some economists say it is wrong to look at just wages because other aspects of employee compensation, notably health costs, have risen. But overall employee compensation — including health and retirement benefits — has also slipped badly, falling to its lowest share of national income in more than 50 years while corporate profits have climbed to their highest share over that time.

via America’s Productivity Climbs, but Wages Stagnate – NYTimes.com.

Profits up, wages down…rinse, recycle and repeat, and pretty soon (took about 30 years this time) you have so much wealth concentration the political process is controlled by  the 0.1% who are the only ones that have enough to donate…which is to say…you end up with 21st Century America and “Tea Party” Republicans.

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